Wednesday, June 3, 2009

Back.

Until we start workshopping a new form, Tantrum is getting together to work out once a month—in theory. Really, we've been squeezing in two: one to fuck around, and one with our guest monologist.

Tonight was just us. Here's how they normally go:
  1. Catch up. Now that we're not doing two shows and two rehearsals a month, and people are doing things like dating and getting married and buying houses, we don't see each other as often. It turns out we like each other, so we have to goof off a little to get going.
  2. Warm up. We usually start with go/yes, just to get moving and get connected. Musical hot-spot is a good one—tonight, we tried it with "Lines from famous American Speeches" (OK, it was a joke, but we rode the wave) and "Movie Quotes." Then we played the turd game (pick a noun, replace it with "turd," and use it in sentences). Toasty!
  3. Work out. Pete and Rob are in charge. Typically, they ask what we want to work on before rehearsal and come up with some exercises.
We played around with editing from the backup line tonight. We've gone from awkward sweep edits (someone runs across the stage to clear the scene, and may or may not start the next one—ew) to cutting and starting with a shape to the end goal: starting the scene either physically or verbally from the second we step off the back-up line. It's generally accepted as the "right" way to do it, but way freakin' tougher than it looks.

This is where I think the Viewpoints work we did last week is really helpful. When you step onto the stage, you can mess with topography, tempo, duration, shape—all without making a single intellectual decision. I'm gradually learning to trust my brain with the facts and dot-connecting and make conscious on-stage choices about something physical or emotional. It keeps me out of my head, in the moment and focused on other players choices instead of the script my brain wants to write.

3 comments:

  1. OK tell me the name of that viewpoints book, I want in.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Can we declare a moratorium on calling rehearsal "working out"? It's a bit self-righteous.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Jill: The Viewpoints Book.
    Josh: You can declare a moratorium on whatever you want.

    ReplyDelete

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